Christopher HUSSEY and Theodate Batchelder

HUSBAND:
[F15150]. Christopher HUSSEY (Deacon, Captain)
Born (about 1596-S?)(in 1598-1599-S4) at Dorking, Surrey, England; son of John HUSSEY [F30300] and Mary WOOD [F30301].

He was christened on 18 February 1599 in Dorking, Surrey, England. (S4). Confirmation of his christening is given in a letter (S4) written in 1880 by a New Bedford member of the Hussey family. Extracts reads:
"I forgot to tell you about my visit to Dorking, where I went before leaving England. It is 26 miles southwest of London, but took me an hour and a half by rail, but through a lovely country. It is beautiful old town. They say the country about there is considered among the most picturesque in England."

"I went to the parish clerk; he had gone out, and his sister thought perhaps the vicar might know the book. So I went there was shown into his study, a lovely old house and a very pretty room in Summer, but a fire-place too small to half warm it. The vicar was a wonderfully handsome and gentle-manly person, who offered to do all he could for me, but said the clerk had the book. I at last found him, and we looked over it together."

"As I knew the exact date of Christopher's birth, it did not take long, although the writing was the same queer German text hand we saw atHampton, which seemed to be the style then, but, strange to say, the book itself looked a hundred years younger than that, it had been kept so much more carefully, and was of parchment."

"We found Christopher, son of John Hussey, was baptized 18th of February, 1599, and looking back a few years, found John Hussey and Marie [Moor or Wood] [I could not make out which] were married December 5, 1593. Then John, son of John, baptized April 29th, 1594, and died November 8th, 1597. There is no other mention of any one of the name of Hussey that we could find in the book, and no person of that name is living there or has been known to live there. The vicar told me it was a Berkshire name. John Hussey probably came there from some other place; and, as there seem to have been no other children that lived, no one of the name remains there." (S4).

It is believed that Christopher Hussey was taken to Holland in his youth by his widowed mother. Many Puritans fled to Holland between 1607 and 1621 to escape the religious persecution that hounded them in England. His family settled in Leyden, Holland under the religious leadership of John Robinson. Apparently it was there that he met Theodate Bachiler, daughter of Rev. Stephen Bachiler and Ann Bate Bachiler and fell in love with her. (S4).

The supposition that our Christopher Hussey was born in 1599 seems corroborated by Nathaniel Weare’s Nathaniel WEARE [F3782] statement made during the Masonian troubles in 1685; that he knew Hussey, as one of the sufferers, to be eighty-six years old. The record of Hussey’s death at Hampton is in agreement with these dates.

It is believed that Christopher Hussey was taken to Holland in his youth by his widowed mother. Many Puritans fled to Holland between 1607 and 1621 to escape the religious persecution that hounded them in England. His family settled in Leyden, Holland under the religious leadership of John Robinson. (S4).

Christopher Hussey married Theodate, daughter of Stephen Bachiler, in 1630 or 1631 in Holland. It is said that Bachiler refused to consent to the marriage of his daughter Theodate until Hussey agreed to go to New England, where Bachiler was preparing to settle. (S4).

Mary Alnora Cox Drennan, a descendant, states that they were married in England in 1631 on their way to Massachusetts. Jessie Gordon Flack states that they were married in Holland in 1631. Their first son, Stephen Hussey was born in England, according to "Maxwell History and Genealogy," but no corroboration has been found for this. (S4).

He journeyed to America aboard the William and Francis which arrived 5 June 1632 at Saugus (Lynn), Massachusetts. Christopher Hussey was recorded as the head of a party. (S4).

He was admitted freeman on 14 May 1634 by an act of the General Court at Boston, Massachusetts while he was living at Lynn, according to "Massachusetts Bay Colony Records." Volume I. (S4)

He removed to Newbury, Massachusetts in 1636. He became a selectman in Newbury in 1636 and was a proprietor there in 1637. (S4)

Following their residence at Newbury they moved to Salisbury, Massachusetts, about four miles north of Newbury where Rev. Bachiler had another disappointing pastoral experience. While at Salisbury Christopher Hussey developed a life-long friendship with Robert Pike, one of the original settlers of the town and a major in the militia there. This was the last of their leap-frog moves in Massachusetts before moving another ten miles north across the state line into New Hampshire to establish Hampton near the Atlantic coast. (S4)

On "8th day, 8th month, 1637" Christopher Hussey was chosen as one of the seven selectmen of Newbury, according to "History of Newbury, Massachusetts" by John J. Currier. He wrote:
Although the inhabitants of Newbury were granted in November 1637 the privilege of removing to Winnacunnet [later Hampton, New Hampshire] no effort was made on their part to obtain possession of that territory until the autumn of 1638 when a petition was signed by a number of Newbury men was presented to the General Court for confirmation of the grant and for liberty to begin a settlement. (S4)

The General Court met September 6, 1638 and recorded:
"The Court grants that the petitioners Mr. Steven Bachiler, Christo. Hussey, Mary Hussey, vidua, . . . with divers other shall have liverty to begin a plantation at Winnacunnet: and Mr. Bradstreete, Mr. Winthrope, Jr. and Mr. Rawson, or some two of them, are to assist in setting out the place of the towne, and apportioning the several quantity of land to each man, so as nothing shall be done therein without allowance from them or 2 of them." (S4)

It is believed that Christopher Hussey was among the first men who moved to Winnacunnet during the winter of 1638. Others arrived in the spring of 1639. Their numbers had increased so that on June 6, 1639 the General Court declared:
"Winnacunnet is alowed to bee a towne, and has power to choose a cunstable and other officers and make orders for the well ordering of their towne, and to send a deputy so the Court, and Christopher Hussey, William Palmer and Richard Swaine to end all businesses vnder 20 shillings for this yeare; the laying out of land to bee by those expressed in the former order." (S4)

Currier further records, "The Rev. Stephen Bachiler has between a minister at Saugus for several years, but, in consequence of some contention among the people there, he removed to Ipswich, then to Cape Cod, and then to Newbury, where he was living in 1638. His son-in-law, Christopher Hussey, probably came to Newbury 12 months earlier." (S4)

They disposed of their property in Newbury June 5, 1639. The town records show:
"It was acknowledged by Mr. Richard Dumer and William Wakefield, town clerk of Winnacunnet, being authorized by Mr. Stephen Bachelour and Christopher Hussey to have sold both theyr house lotts and arable lands, meadows, marsh, orchard, fences, privileges and commons and Whatsoever Rights they had to any lands in the Towne of Newbury for and in consideration of six score pounds already paid. I say they did acknowledge to have full power to sell it unto Mr. John Oliver of Newbury to remaine abide and continue to him and his heyrs forever 6th, Monday, 5th, 1639 as by a Bill of sale doth appeer bearing the same date and subscribed by Mr. Stephen Bachelour and William Wakefield.
Witnesses: Edward Woodman and Richard Lowle. (S4)

In 1639 he served as a representative.

His wife Theodate died in 1648.

Title to 250 acres of land initially granted to Christopher Hussey at Hampton was jeopardized when John Mason, an agent of Sir Ferdinando Gorges, original proprietor of New Hampshire and Maine, won a suit against him. As a result Christopher Hussey was imprisoned, and "he was forbidden to work and forced to live on the charity of his friends," according to "History of New Hampshire."(S4)

Upon receiving his freedom he continued to live in the Hampton area and was named a deputy there in 1650. He, along with others, petitioned the General Court on behalf of Robert Pike 19th, 10th 1654, according to "Winthrop's Journal." On 1st, 11th 1654 Christopher Hussey and his nephew, John Sanborn of Hampton were required to give bond in the amount of 10 pounds in connection with the case.(S4)

He continued as a lieutenant in the militia in 1658 and was promoted to captain in 1664. He was a representative to the General Court in 1658, 1659, 1660 and 1672. He was "Councillor in 1679 until Cranfield came in," according to "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire." When New Hampshire was made a royal province he was one of the commissioners named in the charter. widow of Jeffrey Mingay 9th, 12th month, 1658 in Hampton, according to "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire." He was empowered to perform marriages "within the limits of Hampton" 10th, 18th 1659 by the General Court. He was appointed to a committee to survey land granted to Thomas Lake 12th, 11, 1659. "Maxwell History and Genealogy" states [probably erroneously] that he was a shipowner and master with vessels in the East Indies trade.(S4)

Shortly before this time Christopher Hussey became attracted to the Society of Friends. Quaker missionaries began to arrive in Massachusetts about 1656 and made rapid converts in New England. When the Congregationalists in New Hampshire were converted to the Society, the Puritans of Massachusetts redoubled their efforts in persecution of them. Quakers who remained in Massachusetts did so in fear of their lives. Four Friends were hanged on Boston Common in 1659 and 1660.(S4)

Three Quaker women who came to New Hampshire in 1662 were arrested, tied behind a cart and paraded from town to town on their way out of the province."Three vagabond Quaker women, Anna Coleman, Mary Tompkins and Abbie Ambrose, were made fast to the cart's tail and whipped down their naked backs through the town," according to "History of Rockingham County, New Hampshire" by D. Hamilton Hurd.(S4)

It is believed that the revulsion that Christopher Hussey experienced at the sight of this incident was instrumental in his conversion to the Society of Friends. The entire congregation meeting at Hampton became Quakers early in the Quaker movement.(S4)

Hussey and his nephew John Samborne stood by Robert Pike in his contest with the Bay oligarchs in 1653; and, refusing to recant what they had stated in petition, were placed under bonds.

Christopher Hussey was confirmed a lieutenant in the militia on 14th, 6th, 1653.(S4)

There is no doubt that Hussey stood manfully by his father-in-law Bachiler through the Hampton disturbances, and helped to fit him for his return voyage to England in 1654.

He married (2) Ann, widow of Jeffrey Mingay, on 9 December 1658 at Hampton. (S4).

In 1658 he served again as a representative.

Christopher Hussey and his sons were inclined to the Quaker doctrines, though he seems never to have joined that sect definitely. Both sons had been fined for nonattendance at the Hampton church, and in 1674 Captain Hussey and his son John, with eleven other Hampton men, were admonished for their "breach of the law called Quaker’s meeting". In the same year Stephen Hussey was admonished for attending a Quaker’s meeting at Boston. (S?).

He was the most prominent man in early Hampton. Joseph Dow gave an excellent account of his life in New England. {S?}. Captain Christopher Hussey filled nearly every office of the town or province. He was Deputy to the General Court in 1672.

In 1659 he served again as a representative.

He was one of the purchasers of Nantucket from Mayhew in 1659.

Christopher Hussey became a proprietor on Nantucket Island 7th, 2nd 1659, according to "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire." On 10th, 5th 1660 he was one of the men who bought half the land and grazing rights on the island from the Sachems--Wanamamack and Nickanoose--for 10 pounds. Some chroniclers have recorded that the proprietors considered Nantucket Island as a Quaker sanctuary, removed from the persecution of the Puritans. However, Louis Coffin states, probably accurately, in "The Coffin Family" that it was financial gain that motivated the First Purchasers to buy on Nantucket--not religious persecution.

Nantucket in the Indian dialect meant "the faraway land." It was located 27 miles southof Cape Cod. Nantucket, the town, the county and the island, contributed much to the colonial history of Massachusetts even before it was annexed to the colony in 1692.

Thomas Mayhew of Watertown, Massachusetts was the first owner of Nantucket Island, purchasing it in 1641. In 1659 he lived in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts when he sold his interest in the island to the First Purchasers. It seems that the First Purchasers had to purchase the island a second time--piece by piece from the Indians. Some of the Indians did not recognize Mayhew's English title and would give up the land only for additional compensation.

The first town on the island was called Capaum, later it was renamed Sherburne in 1673 when island was under the government of New York. In 1692 it became a part of Massachusetts. In 1795 the town was moved to Nantucket harbor and renamed Nantucket.

Originally the First Purchasers included ten men: Tristram Coffin, Sr, Thomas Macy, Richard Swain, Thomas Barnard, Petter Coffin, Stephen Greenleaf, John Swain, William Pile, Thomas Mayhew and Christopher Hussey. The ten needed to raise additional capital, and in 1659 at a meeting at Salisbury, Massachusetts it was agreed that each of the ten could invite in a partner. Christopher Hussey invited his old friend, Major Robert Pike to be his partner in the Nantucket investment. It was agreed at the meeting that Major Pike would keep the Salisbury records of the First Purchasers and that Thomas Macy would keep the Nantucket records.

Perhaps the First Purchasers foresaw the development of Nantucket as a profitable investment, but none could imagine the tremendous impact this harbor would have onthe commerce of the world. "History of Nantucket" reports, "For more than a century the island and its commodious harbor was the primary headquarters of the American whaling industry. In 1842 it was homeport to 86 ships and barks, two schooners and two brigs, with a total of 36,000 tonnage, no mean amount in those days of sailing ships and swashbuckling seamen."

Shortly after the Nantucket purchase Christopher Hussey incurred the displeasure of the General Court by petitioning with others, for a mitigation of the sentence of Robert Pike "for seeming to uphold speaking in public without a license." Christopher Hussey and John Bishop had been previously punished for taking sides with Robert Pike who "espoused the cause of Macy and Peasley."(S4).

In 1660 he served again as a representative.

Christopher Hussey was appointed by the General Court in August 1664 to a committee to examine a site on Wolf Island proposed for a mill. (S4).

When Rev. Stephen Bachiler got into a controversy with other church officials at Hampton "Xopher Hussie and 18 other inhabitantes" signed a petition 11th, 6th 1664 in the preacher's behalf.(S4).

Christopher Hussey along with others received a deed 29th, 6th 1671 from Wanamamack, head sachem of Nantucket, of his interest in the island for 40 pounds. (S4).

Later in 1671 he sold his interest in Nantucket to his sons, Stephen Hussey and John Hussey. The deed, dated 23rd, 10th 1671, conveyed for 80 pounds "all my lands, arable land, pasture meadows, woodland, all commonage, rights and privileges due unto me, according to the purchase made by me, with all my cattle, neat cattle, goats and horses, all my stock that is on said island of Nantucket of what kind or quality so ever it be.
s/ Christo. Hussey, Witness: Samuel Dalton."

In April 1662 Christopher Hussey and his son John Hussey were admonished for a breach of the law in a called meeting of the church, according to Hampton Quaker records. (S4).

He was reelected a captain in the Hampton militia 15th, 5th 1672. (S4).

Although it is believed that Christopher Hussey never lived on Nantucket, he is reported to have been there in October 1675, perhaps on a visit. In 1677 Christopher Hussey was among the 50 residents of Hampton who signed a petition requesting that the four towns that composed New Hampshire be returned to the government of Massachusetts. (S4).

Christopher Hussey was the first person in Hampton, New Hampshire to swear allegiance to the king when Charles II was restored to the throne of England. He took the oath on 10 April 1678 before Major Robert Pike, his former business partner. He was one of the seven men appointed by the king who composed the government of New Hampshire upon its separation from Massachusetts 18th, 9th month, 1679, according to "Acts of the Privy Council." He was a representative to the New Hampshire Council from 1679 to 1685. (S4).

On March 2, 1683 Christopher Hussey, Richard Waldren and 17 other elderly men wrote a petition requesting that they be exempted from a "head tax" recently imposed. The petition "humbly showeth" etc:
"Whereas we conceive that it is the laudable custom of civil and much more Christian nations to have tender respect to the decrepit by age, we, your Honor's humble petitioners, being sundry of us about and above 70 years of age, some of us above 80, others near 90, being past our labor and work, do crave that favor, if your Honor see meet that we may be freed from head money, we being heartily willing our estates should pay their proportion to all public charges; but we humbly crave our heads may be spared, since our hands can do so little for them.

We also humbly suggest that some of us, that lived long in England, remember not that we paid anything for our heads, though we did for our estates. All of which we present to your Honor, craving pardon for our boldness; if your Honor out of your clemency shall see cause to favor us in our request we shall not cease heartily to pray for your Honor and remain your aged and humble suppliants.
/s/ John Mason Christopher Hussey" [and 17 others] (S4). He is said to have a son named Joseph. No such son appears in Hussey’s will of 1685. This "son" Joseph comes from a misreading by Joseph Dow of a record of Hampton Representatives to the General Court from which he lists Joseph as a Deputy for the year 1672. The actual record reads "Christopher" Hussey, not "Joseph".

Christopher Hussey wrote his will February 26, 1684-85 at Hampton and wrote a codicil at Salisbury October 28, 1685. His will, recorded in "Province of New Hampshire Probate Records," Volume I, read:
"The last will and testament of Capt. Christopher Hussey made the 28th day of Feburary, 1684".
"I, Christopher Hussey, being through the mercy of God in health of body and of sound memory and disposing capacity for which bless the Lord; and yet being stricken in years . . ."

"Imprimis: I give my two sons Steven Hussey and John Hussey my farm with all priviliges thereof, namely the hundred and fifty acres of meadow and upland granted me by ye town as also 50 acres of marsh which I bought adjacent to it. I say I give it by equal parts, that is to say, the one half of it to my son Steven, his heirs and assigns in fee simple, and the other half to my son John in like manner only they paying to my daughter, Mary, as hereafter in my will expressed."

"Item: I give to my daughter, Mary Hussey, now wife of Thomas Page, my seven ackers of medow lying near Benjamin Shaw's: and that peece of medowthrough which the highway lyeth and also two shares in the ox common and also two shares of cow common and also I do order that my son, John Smith, shall pay her thirty pounds and my two sons, John and Steven, shall pay her forty pound a peece in goods."

"Item: I give and bequeath to my daughter, Hulda, in the like manner all the rest of my lands and housing and Common Rights in the towne of Hampton and all the household goods and stuff remaining, that is to say, my house and all in it or with it all the land adjacent and the planting lot toward the spring, two shares in the ox common and two shares in the cow common and do order and appoint that she shall pay to my daughter, Mary, thirty pound toward her pension."

"It is my will that the Legasies that I have bequeethed to my daughter, Mary, that part of it which is in land that she shall enjoy it immediately after my decease, and the thirty pound that she shall have of my son, John Smith, husband of my daughter, Hulda, I do will it to be paid to her in two years aftermy decease, that is to say, thereon half the first year and the other half the second year in good pay of Country."

"It is my will also that the forty pound a peece that I have willed to my two sons, Steven and John Hussey to pay her that it be paid also within or by the end of the two years next after my decease in some good pay of the Country. And, in case of fayler, she, my said daughter, shall have in lue thereof, thirty acres of the farm whereof shall be the old field lying on the other side of the way on end whereof butts upon my old house, and the other toward the mill river by the bridge and the rest to be made of the farm with said lands shall be engaged hereby and shall be responsible for the payment of the aforementioned some ten or twelve acres where of shall be meadow."

"I do upon further consideration will and declare that it shall be in my daughter, Mary's, choice whether she shall have the land forementioned in the farm or 80 pounds of my two sons Steven and John Hussey."

Lastly I make and ordain my son, John Hussey and my son, John Smith, to be joint executors of this, my will, and in case either of them should die before they have executed the same then the sole power to be in the survivor, and in case they should both die before as above said, then I do appoint my daughter, Mary, in case she should also in like manner fayle, then I appoint my son, Steven, to be my executor in their stead. And my trusty friends, Richard Waldren and Major Robert Pike, to be overseers of this, my will. In witness of all which I have set my hand and seal the day and year aforesaid mentioned." s/Christopher Hussey "Signed and sealed and declared to be his last will and testament before us.
s/ Moses Pike s/ Robert Pike s/ Steven Tuck [his mark]" (S4).

Christopher Hussey died about a year after he wrote his will on 6 March 1685-1686 at Hampton, New Hampshire, "being about 90 years old." Christopher's death, as recorded in HVR 1:9, reads: "Cpt Christepher Hussy Died the S[torn]t of day of march 1685 or 1686 being about 90 years of Age was Entred the 8th of march 1685 or 1686." (S6). He was buried at Hampton on 8 March 1686.

The estate of Christopher Hussey was inventoried March 25, 1686 by Joseph Dow and John Tuck who set the value at 651 pounds, 13 shillings. It was itemized as:
"House, orchard and land adjoining 42 pounds Upland on the farm 200 pounds 50 acres meadow 100 pounds 40 acres marsh 60 pounds 15 acres marsh 24 pounds Planting land 28 pounds Spring meadow 30 pounds 7 acres meadow 14 pounds Meadow 6 pounds Land at New Plantation 5 pounds Land at North Division 6 pounds Four shares, ox commons 24 pounds Four shares, cow commons 30 pounds 12 acres pasture 20 pounds 3 cows, 1 ox, 1 one-year-old beast 12 pounds Beds, bolsters, blankets, rugs curtains 12 pounds Table, linen, sheets, etc 10 pounds" (S4).

WIFE (1):
[F15151]. Theodate BACHILER. (BATCHELDER). (pronounced theo-dah-tay).
Born (about 1590)(in 1598-S4)(about 1610) at Wherwell, Hampshire, England; daughter of Reverend Stephen BACHILER [(F15160)] and Ann BATE [(F15161)].

She married Christopher HUSSEY about 1630 in Holland.

She died on 20 October 1649 at Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.

CHILDREN of Christopher HUSSEY [F15150] and Theodate BATCHELDER [F15151]:
  1. Stephen HUSSEY. Born in 1630-1631, probably in Holland. Christened in Lynn, Massachusetts by his grandfather, Rev. Stephen Bachiler. [Though this is disputed]. He married Martha Bunker on 8 October 1676. He was a freeholder of Sherburne, a representative to the General Court, organizer of the Society of Friends (Quakers) on Nantucket. His will was dated 17th 5th month 1716. He died 2nd 2 month (2 April) 1718 in Nantucket, Massachusetts and was buried in the Friends Burial Ground, Nantucket, Massachusetts.
  2. John HUSSEY Sr. Born in 1635, probably in Lynn, Massachusetts. He was christened the last day of ye last mo: Ao 1635 in Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts. He married Rebecca Perkins on 2 September 1659. They settled in Hampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire and then Newcastle, Newcastle, Delaware. He was a Quaker preacher. He owned Nonesuch plantation. He was a member of the Pennsylvania Assembly in 1696. His will was dated 8 May 1707.
  3. Mary HUSSEY. Born about 1 April 1638 at Newbury, Essex, Massassachusetts. She was christened on 2 April (2nd, 2nd) 1638 at Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts. She married (1) Thomas Page on 2 February 1664 at Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire. They established a homestead on the Exeter road in North Hampton, also called Pagetown, in which the family lived for many generations. Thomas died on 6 or 8 September 1686 at Hampton. she married (2) Henry GREEN on 10 March 1690-1691 at Hampton, N.H. She married (3) Henry DOW III on 10 November 1704 at Hampton, N.H. She died on 21 January 1732-1733 at Hampton, N.H.
  4. Theodate HUSSEY. Born 8th, 8th, 1640. Christened on 23 August 1640 in Hampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire. She died on 20 October 1649 in Hampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire.
  5. Huldah HUSSEY. Born in 1643. She married John Smith 26 Feb 1666/7 in Hampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire.
  6. NOTE: Christopher and Theodate had 5 children, not 6 as reported by Savage and Dow. There was no son named Joseph. This error derives from Dow's list of representatives from Hampton to the General Court, which erroneusly gives a Joseph Hussey in 1672. The correct reading of the record is for Christopher Hussey himself. (S?,S5).


WIFE (2):
Ann CAPON.
Widow of Jeffrey Mingay. She married Christopher HUSSEY on 9 December 1658 at Hampton, New Hampshire.

No children were born to Christopher Hussey and Ann Mingay Hussey. (S4).

Ann Mingay Hussey died June 24, 1680, according to "Genealogical History of New Hampshire." Christopher Hussey was reappointed captain of the Hampton militia March 25, 1681. (S4).

SOURCES:

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S4: Following their residence at Newbury they moved to Salisbury, Massachusetts, about four miles north of Newbury where Rev. Bachiler had another disappointing pastoral experience. While at Salisbury Christopher Hussey developed a life-long friendship with Robert Pike, one of the original settlers of the town and a major in the militia there. This was the last of their leap-frog moves in Massachusetts before moving another ten miles north across the state line into New Hampshire to establish Hampton near the Atlantic coast. Rev. Stephen Bachiler and some followers attempted a settlement at Mattakeese [later Yarmouth], Massachusetts in 1637. The effort was described by Gov. John Winthrop in his journal: "March 30, 1638: Another plantation was now in hand at Mattakeese, six miles beyond Sandwich. The undertaker of this was one Mr. Batchellor, late pastor of Saugus, being about 76 years of age; yet he walked thither on foot in a very hard season. He and his companions, all being poor men, finding the difficulty, gave it over, and others took it." On "8th day, 8th month, 1637" Christopher Hussey was chosen as one of the seven selectmen of Newbury, according to "History of Newbury, Massachusetts" by John J. Currier. He wrote: Although the inhabitants of Newbury were granted in November 1637 the privilege of removing to Winnacunnet [later Hampton, New Hampshire] no effort was made on their part to obtain possession of that territory until the autumn of 1638 when a petition was signed by a number of Newbury men was presented to the General Court for confirmation of the grant and for liberty to begin a settlement. The General Court met September 6, 1638 and recorded: "The Court grants that the petitioners Mr. Steven Bachiler, Christo. Hussey, Mary Hussey, vidua, . . . with divers other shall have liverty to begin a plantation at Winnacunnet: and Mr. Bradstreete, Mr. Winthrope, Jr. and Mr. Rawson, or some two of them, are to assist in setting out the place of the towne, and apportioning the several quantity of land to each man, so as nothing shall be done therein without allowance from them or 2 of them." It is believed that Christopher Hussey was among the first men who moved to Winnacunnet during the winter of 1638. Others arrived in the spring of 1639. Their numbers had increased so that on June 6, 1639 the General Court declared: "Winnacunnet is alowed to bee a towne, and has power to choose a cunstable and other officers and make orders for the well ordering of their towne, and to send a deputy so the Court, and Christopher Hussey, William Palmer and Richard Swaine to end all businesses vnder 20 shillings for this yeare; the laying out of land to bee by those expressed in the former order." Currier further records, "The Rev. Stephen Bachiler has between a minister at Saugus for several years, but, in consequence of some contention among the people there, he removed to Ipswich, then to Cape Cod, and then to Newbury, where he was living in 1638. His son-in-law, Christopher Hussey, probably came to Newbury 12 months earlier." They disposed of their property in Newbury June 5, 1639. The town records show: "It was acknowledged by Mr. Richard Dumer and William Wakefield, town clerk of Winnacunnet, being authorized by Mr. Stephen Bachelour and Christopher Hussey to have sold both theyr house lotts and arable lands, meadows, marsh, orchard, fences, privileges and commons and Whatsoever Rights they had to any lands in the Towne of Newbury for and in consideration of six score pounds already paid. I say they did acknowledge to have full power to sell it unto Mr. John Oliver of Newbury to remaine abide and continue to him and his heyrs forever 6th, Monday, 5th, 1639 as by a Bill of sale doth appeer bearing the same date and subscribed by Mr. Stephen Bachelour and William Wakefield. Witnesses: Edward Woodman and Richard Lowle." When the Rev. Bachiler made the move to Hampton in 1638 [Savage's "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire" sets the date as 1639] Christopher Hussey and Theodate Bachiler Hussey accompanied him along with Mary Wood Hussey. During this period Christopher Hussey reportedly participated in the organization and settlement of Haverhill, Massachusetts also. With high hopes Rev. Stephen Bachiler began his work with the Congregational church of Hampton, New Hampshire, a town which he named and organized, according to "The Sanborn Family" written by Nathan Sanborn, M.D. of Henniker, New Hampshire. "First Comers to Hampton, New Hampshire" by Edward Colcord in an abstract of Norfolk Court Files states that "Mr. Batcheller, Mr. Hussah, Abraham Perkins, Isaac Perkins and Moses Cox, young man that had lot, came to Hampton in the first summer." [1638] Christopher Hussey was named to the "Commission to end small causes, under 20 shillings," similar to a justice of the peace court May 22, 1639 in Hampton. He was appointed "lot layer" [surveyor] October 31, 1639. He was granted an additional 250 acres 30th, 6th month, 1640. He was designated to "view the highway toward Colchester 25th, 8th, 1640." He was the first deacon in the church at Hampton in 1640 and was made moderator of the church in 1641, a post he held again in 1663-64 and in 1672. On 29th, 1st, 1641 he and two others were selected to "oversee the building of the new meetinghouse." On 29th, 4th 1641 he was appointed to "conferre of ye ferry place." He was named as a commissioner by the General Court June 2, 1641. Christopher Hussey joined other Hampton settlers 7th, 3rd 1643 in a petition to the governor and General Court complaining of William Haward, military officer of the settlement. In 1645 it was specified that he was to have "two shares of the 147 allotted, besides his farm." The meetinghouse seating arrangement on March 4, 1649-50 was listed in "First Comers to Hampton, New Hampshire" as: "at the table, first seat, Cristofar Husse [indicating that he was the 'first deacon'], second seat, Isak Perkingses; third seat on south side, Moyses Cox; the first seat next to Mistris Wheelwrit, ould Mistris Husse, her dauter Husse [probably her daughter-in-law, Theodate Bachiler Hussey." He was town clerk from 1650 to 1653. His name often appeared on trial jury and grand jury panels. He was a selectman in Hampton in 1650, 1658 and 1664, according to "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire." "Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy" shows him as a resident of Hampton Falls, New Hampshire in 1650. In that year he sold all his property at Hampton and "moved to the Falls side." On 6th, 9th 1653 he was assessed a "tax of 2:8:3" indicating that he was the second largest taxpayer in the area. When Rev. Stephen Bachiler was preparing to leave Hampton he gave to Christopher Hussey and Theodate Bachiler Hussey "his cattle, goods and debts," according to "Pioneers of Massachusetts" by Charles Henry Pope. Colcott Colcord, a planter who lived at Salem, Massachusetts in 1637, gave a deposition 8th, 4th 1673 about the gift for legal records. Colcord lived in Dover, New Hampshire in 1673. Christopher Hussey was confirmed a lieutenant in the militia 14th, 6th, 1653. Theodate Bachiler Hussey died at Hampton October 20, 1649, according to Martha Burr Hollingsworth. Title to 250 acres of land initially granted to Christopher Hussey at Hampton was jeopardized when John Mason, an agent of Sir Ferdinando Gorges, original proprietor of New Hampshire and Maine, won a suit against him. As a result Christopher Hussey was imprisoned, and "he was forbidden to work and forced to live on the charity of his friends," according to "History of New Hampshire." Upon receiving his freedom he continued to live in the Hampton area and was named a deputy there in 1650. He, along with others, petitioned the General Court on behalf of Robert Pike 19th, 10th 1654, according to "Winthrop's Journal." On 1st, 11th 1654 Christopher Hussey and his nephew, John Sanborn of Hampton were required to give bond in the amount of 10 pounds in connection with the case. He continued as a lieutenant in the militia in 1658 and was promoted to captain in 1664. He was a representative to the General Court in 1658, 1659, 1660 and 1672. He was "Councillor in 1679 until Cranfield came in," according to "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire." When New Hampshire was made a royal province he was one of the commissioners named in the charter. widow of Jeffrey Mingay 9th, 12th month, 1658 in Hampton, according to "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire." He was empowered to perform marriages "within the limits of Hampton" 10th, 18th 1659 by the General Court. He was appointed to a committee to survey land granted to Thomas Lake 12th, 11, 1659. "Maxwell History and Genealogy" states [probably erroneously] that he was a shipowner and master with vessels in the East Indies trade. Shortly before this time Christopher Hussey became attracted to the Society of Friends. Quaker missionaries began to arrive in Massachusetts about 1656 and made rapid converts in New England. When the Congregationalists in New Hampshire were converted to the Society, the Puritans of Massachusetts redoubled their efforts in persecution of them. Quakers who remained in Massachusetts did so in fear of their lives. Four Friends were hanged on Boston Common in 1659 and 1660. Three Quaker women who came to New Hampshire in 1662 were arrested, tied behind a cart and paraded from town to town on their way out of the province."Three vagabond Quaker women, Anna Coleman, Mary Tompkins and Abbie Ambrose, were made fast to the cart's tail and whipped down their naked backs through the town," according to "History of Rockingham County, New Hampshire" by D. Hamilton Hurd. It is believed that the revulsion that Christopher Hussey experienced at the sight of this incident was instrumental in his conversion to the Society of Friends. The entire congregation meeting at Hampton became Quakers early in the Quaker movement. George Fox, founder of the Quakers in England, came to the colonies in 1672, and his presence gave additional impetus to the Quaker zeal. William Penn founded Pennsylvania in 1682 as a "holy experiment in the application of Quaker ideals to the state," but the Friends were not able to give their principles full expression because the crown imposed limitations on the colony's policies. The Toleration Act of 1689 put an end inciples full expression because the crown imposed limitations on the colony's policies. The Toleration Act of 1689 put an end being accepted by the other colonists. The Quakers, on the whole, excluded themselves from politIcal life by refusing to take any kind of oaths. They denied themselves "frivolous pursuits of pleasure," which included music and art. They opposed war and slavery. They refused to pay tithes and to render military service. They had no formal worship; they practiced no communion nor baptism. Since every child born to Quaker parents was automatically a Quaker, the church grew rapidly in the colonies. They worked for fair treatment of the Indians, abolition of slavery, popular education, temperance, democracy and religious liberty. By 1700 the Friends were powerful in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Rhode Island, North Carolina and Maryland. Between 1725 and 1775 there were several migrations of Quakers from New England and Pennsylvania to North Carolina and South Carolina. About 1800 however, the Friends found it impossible to live in the slave-holding South and began to move to the free territories of Ohio and Indiana. Christopher Hussey became a proprietor on Nantucket Island 7th, 2nd 1659, according to "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire." On 10th, 5th 1660 he was one of the men who bought half the land and grazing rights on the island from the Sachems -- Wanamamack and Nickanoose -- for 10 pounds. Some chroniclers have recorded that the proprietors considered Nantucket Island as a Quaker sanctuary, removed from the persecution of the Puritans. However, Louis Coffin states, probably accurately, in "The Coffin Family" that it was financial gain that motivated the First Purchasers to buy on Nantucket--not religious persecution. Nantucket in the Indian dialect meant "the faraway land." It was located 27 miles south of Cape Cod. Nantucket, the town, the county and the island, contributed much to the colonial history of Massachusetts even before it was annexed to the colony in 1692. Thomas Mayhew of Watertown, Massachusetts was the first owner of Nantucket Island, purchasing it in 1641. In 1659 he lived in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts when he sold his interest in the island to the First Purchasers. It seems that the First Purchasers had to purchase the island a second time -- piece by piece from the Indians. Some of the Indians did not recognize Mayhew's English title and would give up the land only for additionalcompensation. The first town on the island was called Capaum, later it was renamed Sherburne in 1673 when island was under the government of New York. In 1692 it became a part of Massachusetts. In 1795 the town was moved to Nantucket harbor and renamed Nantucket. Originally the First Purchasers included ten men: Tristram Coffin, Sr, Thomas Macy, Richard Swain, Thomas Barnard, Petter Coffin, Stephen Greenleaf, John Swain, William Pile, Thomas Mayhew and Christopher Hussey. The ten needed to raise additional capital, and in 1659 at a meeting at Salisbury, Massachusetts it was agreed that each of the ten could invite in a partner. Christopher Hussey invited his old friend, Major Robert Pike to be his partner in the Nantucket investment. It was agreed at the meeting that Major Pike would keep the Salisbury records of the First Purchasers and that Thomas Macy would keep the Nantucket records. Perhaps the First Purchasers foresaw the development of Nantucket as a profitable investment, but none could imagine the tremendous impact this harbor would have on the commerce of the world. "History of Nantucket" reports, "For more than a century the island and its commodious harbor was the primary headquarters of the American whaling industry. In 1842 it was homeport to 86 ships and barks, two schooners and two brigs, with a total of 36,000 tonnage, no mean amount in those days of sailing ships and swashbuckling seamen." Shortly after the Nantucket purchase Christopher Hussey incurred the displeasure of the General Court by petitioning with others, for a mitigation of the sentence of Robert Pike "for seeming to uphold speaking in public without a license." Christopher Hussey and John Bishop had been previously punished for taking sides with Robert Pike who "espoused the cause of Macy and Peasley." In April 1662 Christopher Hussey and his son John Hussey were admonished for a breach of the law in a called meeting of the church, according to Hampton Quaker records. Christopher Hussey was appointed by the General Court in August 1664 to a committee to examine a site on Wolf Island proposed for a mill. Christopher Hussey along with others received a deed 29th, 6th 1671 from Wanamamack, head sachem of Nantucket, of his interest in the island for 40 pounds. Later in 1671 he sold his interest in Nantucket to his sons, Stephen Hussey and John Hussey. The deed, dated 23rd, 10th 1671, conveyed for 80 pounds "all my lands, arable land, pasture meadows, woodland, all commonage, rights and privileges due unto me, according to the purchase made by me, with all my cattle, neat cattle, goats and horses, all my stock that is on said island of Nantucket of what kind or quality so ever it be. s/ Christo. Hussey, Witness: Samuel Dalton." He was reelected a captain in the Hampton militia 15th, 5th 1672. Although it is believed that Christopher Hussey never lived on Nantucket, he is reported to have been there in October 1675, perhaps on a visit. In 1677 Christopher Hussey was among the 50 residents of Hampton who signed a petition requesting that the four towns that composed New Hampshire be returned to the government of Massachusetts. Christopher Hussey was the first person in Hampton, New Hampshire to swear allegiance to the king when Charles II was restored to the throne of England. He took the oath April 10, 1678 before Major Robert Pike, his former business partner. He was one of the seven men appointed by the king who composed the government of New Hampshire upon its separation from Massachusetts 18th, 9th month, 1679, according to "Acts of the Privy Council." He was a representative to the New Hampshire Council from 1679 to 1685. Ann Mingay Hussey died June 24, 1680, according to "Genealogical History of New Hampshire." Christopher Hussey was reappointed captain of the Hampton militia March 25, 1681. On March 2, 1683 Christopher Hussey, Richard Waldren and 17 other elderly men wrote a petition requesting that they be exempted from a "head tax" recently imposed. The petition "humbly showeth" etc: "Whereas we conceive that it is the laudable custom of civil and much more Christian nations to have tender respect to the decrepit by age, we, your Honor's humble petitioners, being sundry of us about and above 70 years of age, some of us above 80, others near 90, being past our labor and work, do crave that favor, if your Honor see meet that we may be freed from head money, we being heartily willing our estates should pay their proportion to all public charges; but we humbly crave our heads may be spared, since our hands can do so little for them. We also humbly suggest that some of us, that lived long in England, remember not that we paid anything for our heads, though we did for our estates. All of which we present to your Honor, craving pardon for our boldness; if your Honor out of your clemency shall see cause to favor us in our request we shall not cease heartily to pray for your Honor and remain your aged and humble suppliants. /s/ John Mason Christopher Hussey" [and 17 others] Christopher Hussey wrote his will February 26, 1684-85 at Hampton and wrote a codicil at Salisbury October 28, 1685. His will, recorded in "Province of New Hampshire Probate Records," Volume I, read: "The last will and testament of Capt. Christopher Hussey made the 28th day of Feburary, 1684". "I, Christopher Hussey, being through the mercy of God in health of body and of sound memory and disposing capacity for which bless the Lord; and yet being stricken in years . . ." "Imprimis: I give my two sons Steven Hussey and John Hussey my farm with all priviliges thereof, namely the hundred and fifty acres of meadow and upland granted me by ye town as also 50 acres of marsh which I bought adjacent to it. I say I give it by equal parts, that is to say, the one half of it to my son Steven, his heirs and assigns in fee simple, and the other half to my son John in like manner only they paying to my daughter, Mary, as hereafter in my will expressed." "Item: I give to my daughter, Mary Hussey, now wife of Thomas Page, my seven ackers of medow lying near Benjamin Shaw's: and that peece of medow through which the highway lyeth and also two shares in the ox common and also two shares of cow common and also I do order that my son, John Smith, shall pay her thirty pounds and my two sons, John and Steven, shall pay her forty pound a peece in goods." "Item: I give and bequeath to my daughter, Hulda, in the like manner all the rest of my lands and housing and Common Rights in the towne of Hampton and all the household goods and stuff remaining, that is to say, my house and all in it or with it all the land adjacent and the planting lot toward the spring, two shares in the ox common and two shares in the cow common and do order and appoint that she shall pay to my daughter, Mary, thirty pound toward her pension." "It is my will that the Legasies that I have bequeethed to my daughter, Mary, that part of it which is in land that she shall enjoy it immediately after my decease, and the thirty pound that she shall have of my son, John Smith, husband of my daughter, Hulda, I do will it to be paid to her in two years after my decease, that is to say, thereon half the first year and the other half the second year in good pay of Country." "It is my will also that the forty pound a peece that I have willed to my two sons, Steven and John Hussey to pay her that it be paid also within or by the end of the two years next after my decease in some good pay of the Country. And, in case of fayler, she, my said daughter, shall have in lue thereof, thirty acres of the farm whereof shall be the old field lying on the other side of the way on end whereof butts upon my old house, and the other toward the mill river by the bridge and the rest to be made of the farm with said lands shall be engaged hereby and shall be responsible for the payment of the aforementioned some ten or twelve acres where of shall be meadow." "I do upon further consideration will and declare that it shall be in my daughter, Mary's, choice whether she shall have the land forementioned in the farm or 80 pounds of my two sons Steven and John Hussey." Lastly I make and ordain my son, John Hussey and my son, John Smith, to be joint executors of this, my will, and in case either of them should die before they have executed the same then the sole power to be in the survivor, and in case they should both die before as above said, then I do appoint my daughter, Mary, in case she should also in like manner fayle, then I appoint my son, Steven, to be my executor in their stead. And my trusty friends, Richard Waldren and Major Robert Pike, to be overseers of this, my will. In witness of all which I have set my hand and seal the day and year aforesaid mentioned." s/Christopher Hussey "Signed and sealed and declared to be his last will and testament before us. s/ Moses Pike s/ Robert Pike s/ Steven Tuck [his mark]" Christopher Hussey died about a year after he wrote his will on March 6, 1685-86 at age 88. He was buried at Hampton March 8, 1686, according to Martha Burr Hollingsworth. The estate of Christopher Hussey was inventoried March 25, 1686 by Joseph Dow and John Tuck who set the value at 651 pounds, 13 shillings. It was itemized as: "House, orchard and land adjoining 42 pounds Upland on the farm 200 pounds 50 acres meadow 100 pounds 40 acres marsh 60 pounds 15 acres marsh 24 pounds Planting land 28 pounds Spring meadow 30 pounds 7 acres meadow 14 pounds Meadow 6 pounds Land at New Plantation 5 pounds Land at North Division 6 pounds Four shares, ox commons 24 pounds Four shares, cow commons 30 pounds 12 acres pasture 20 pounds 3 cows, 1 ox, 1 one-year-old beast 12 pounds Beds, bolsters, blankets, rugs curtains 12 pounds Table, linen, sheets, etc. 10 pounds." Christopher Hussey and Theodate Bachiler Hussey were identified as eleventh-generation grandparents of President Richard Milhous Nixon, Nos. 1696 and 1697 in "The Ancestry of Richard Milhous Nixon." Children born to Christopher Hussey and Theodate Bachiler Hussey include: Stephen Hussey born in 1630 John Hussey born in 1635 Mary Hussey baptized 2nd, 2nd, 1638 Theodate Hussey born 8th, 8th 1640 Huldah Hussey born in 1643 - married John Smith No children were born to Christopher Hussey and Ann Mingay Hussey. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- See: http://stefanovich.com/Hussey/Christopher_HUSSEY.html | -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- CHRISTOPHER HUSSEY (February 18, 1598/99 - March 6, 1667/68) GENETIC PARENTS Father: John HUSSEY (1570 - July 24, 1632) Mother: Marie WOOD (1570 - June 16, 1660) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- GENETIC CHILDREN Stephen HUSSEY b 1632 Lynn, Mass., d 1718 Nantucket, Mass., m Martha Bunker; John HUSSEY b 1636 Lynn, Mass., m Rebecca Perkins 1659, migrated to Newcastle, Delaware Mary HUSSEY b 1637 m Thomas Page, Henry Green, Cpt Henry Dow; Hulda HUSSEY b 1643 m John Smith Theodate HUSSEY b 20 Aug 1640 d 20 Oct 1645 Joseph HUSSEY -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- BASIC DATA Names: Christopher HUSSEY Born: Abt. February 18, 1598/99 in Dorking, Surreyshire, England Baptized: February 18, 1598/99 in Dorking, Surreyshire, England Married: Theodate Batchiler (Abt. 1590 - October 20, 1649) Resided: Hampton, NH Occupation: Died: March 6, 1685/86 Hampton, NH. Buried: Hampton, NH. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- NOTES Source: THE HUSSEY MILLENNIUM From: http://www.llano.net/gowen | Christopher Hussey was recorded as the head of a party which arrived after 88 days at sea on the "William and Francis" June 5, 1632 at Saugus, [later Lynn] Massachusetts by Gov. John Winthrop in "Winthrop's Journal." "Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy" states [erroneously] that he was a resident of Charlestown, Massachusetts in 1630. The Rev. Bachiler began immediately to establish a church at Lynn, and his grandson, Stephen Hussey was the first child baptized by his grandfather in the new church. Stephen Hussey was the second child born in Lynn, according to "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire." Christopher Hussey became a freeman May 14, 1634 by an act of the General Court at Boston, Massachusetts while he was living at Lynn, according to "Massachusetts Bay Colony Records." Volume I. He removed to Newbury, Massachusetts in 1636. He became a selectman in Newbury in 1636 and was a proprietor there in 1637. Following their residence at Newbury they moved to Salisbury, Massachusetts, about four miles north of Newbury where Rev. Bachiler had another disappointing pastoral experience. While at Salisbury Christopher Hussey developed a life-long friendship with Robert Pike, one of the original settlers of the town and a major in the militia there. This was the last of their leap-frog moves in Massachusetts before moving another ten miles north across the state line into New Hampshire to establish Hampton near the Atlantic coast. Rev. Stephen Bachiler and some followers attempted a settlement at Mattakeese [later Yarmouth], Massachusetts in 1637. The effort was described by Gov. John Winthrop in his journal: "March 30, 1638: Another plantation was now in hand at Mattakeese, six miles beyond Sandwich. The undertaker of this was one Mr. Batchellor, late pastor of Saugus, being about 76 years of age; yet he walked thither on foot in a very hard season. He and his companions, all being poor men, finding the difficulty, gave it over, and others took it." On "8th day, 8th month, 1637" Christopher Hussey was chosen as one of the seven selectmen of Newbury, according to "History of Newbury, Massachusetts" by John J. Currier. He wrote: Although the inhabitants of Newbury were granted in November 1637 the privilege of removing to Winnacunnet [later Hampton, New Hampshire] no effort was made on their part to obtain possession of that territory until the autumn of 1638 when a petition was signed by a number of Newbury men was presented to the General Court for confirmation of the grant and for liberty to begin a settlement. The General Court met September 6, 1638 and recorded: "The Court grants that the petitioners Mr. Steven Bachiler, Christo. Hussey, Mary Hussey, vidua, . . . with divers other shall have liverty to begin a plantation at Winnacunnet: and Mr. Bradstreete, Mr. Winthrope, Jr. and Mr. Rawson, or some two of them, are to assist in setting out the place of the towne, and apportioning the several quantity of land to each man, so as nothing shall be done therein without allowance from them or 2 of them." It is believed that Christopher Hussey was among the first men who moved to Winnacunnet during the winter of 1638. Others arrived in the spring of 1639. Their numbers had increased so that on June 6, 1639 the General Court declared: "Winnacunnet is alowed to bee a towne, and has power to choose a cunstable and other officers and make orders for the well ordering of their towne, and to send a deputy so the Court, and Christopher Hussey, William Palmer and Richard Swaine to end all businesses vnder 20 shillings for this yeare; the laying out of land to bee by those expressed in the former order." Currier further records, "The Rev. Stephen Bachiler has between a minister at Saugus for several years, but, in consequence of some contention among the people there, he removed to Ipswich, then to Cape Cod, and then to Newbury, where he was living in 1638. His son-in-law, Christopher Hussey, probably came to Newbury 12 months earlier." They disposed of their property in Newbury June 5, 1639. The town records show: "It was acknowledged by Mr. Richard Dumer and William Wakefield, town clerk of Winnacunnet, being authorized by Mr. Stephen Bachelour and Christopher Hussey to have sold both theyr house lotts and arable lands, meadows, marsh, orchard, fences, privileges and commons and Whatsoever Rights they had to any lands in the Towne of Newbury for and in consideration of six score pounds already paid. I say they did acknowledge to have full power to sell it unto Mr. John Oliver of Newbury to remaine abide and continue to him and his heyrs forever 6th, Monday, 5th, 1639 as by a Bill of sale doth appeer bearing the same date and subscribed by Mr. Stephen Bachelour and William Wakefield. Witnesses: Edward Woodman and Richard Lowle." When the Rev. Bachiler made the move to Hampton in 1638 [Savage's "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire" sets the date as 1639] Christopher Hussey and Theodate Bachiler Hussey accompanied him along with Mary Wood Hussey. During this period Christopher Hussey reportedly participated in the organization and settlement of Haverhill, Massachusetts also. With high hopes Rev. Stephen Bachiler began his work with the Congregational church of Hampton, New Hampshire, a town which he named and organized, according to "The Sanborn Family" written by Nathan Sanborn, M.D. of Henniker, New Hampshire. "First Comers to Hampton, New Hampshire" by Edward Colcord in an abstract of Norfolk Court Files states that "Mr. Batcheller, Mr. Hussah, Abraham Perkins, Isaac Perkins and Moses Cox, young man that had lot, came to Hampton in the first summer." [1638] Christopher Hussey was named to the "Commission to end small causes, under 20 shillings," similar to a justice of the peace court May 22, 1639 in Hampton. He was appointed "lot layer" [surveyor] October 31, 1639. He was granted an additional 250 acres 30th, 6th month, 1640. He was designated to "view the highway toward Colchester 25th, 8th, 1640." He was the first deacon in the church at Hampton in 1640 and was made moderator of the church in 1641, a post he held again in 1663-64 and in 1672. On 29th, 1st, 1641 he and two others were selected to "oversee the building of the new meetinghouse." On 29th, 4th 1641 he was appointed to "conferre of ye ferry place." He was named as a commissioner by the General Court June 2, 1641. Christopher Hussey joined other Hampton settlers 7th, 3rd 1643 in a petition to the governor and General Court complaining of William Haward, military officer of the settlement. In 1645 it was specified that he was to have "two shares of the 147 allotted, besides his farm." The meetinghouse seating arrangement on March 4, 1649-50 was listed in "First Comers to Hampton, New Hampshire" as: "at the table, first seat, Cristofar Husse [indicating that he was the 'first deacon'], second seat, Isak Perkingses; third seat on south side, Moyses Cox; the first seat next to Mistris Wheelwrit, ould Mistris Husse, her dauter Husse [probably her daughter-in-law, Theodate Bachiler Hussey." He was town clerk from 1650 to 1653. His name often appeared on trial jury and grand jury panels. He was a selectman in Hampton in 1650, 1658 and 1664, accordingto "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire." "Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy" shows him as a resident of Hampton Falls, New Hampshire in 1650. In that year he sold all his property at Hampton and "moved to the Falls side." On 6th, 9th 1653 he was assessed a "tax of 2:8:3" indicating that he was the second largest taxpayer in the area. When Rev. Stephen Bachiler got into a controversy with other church officials at Hampton "Xopher Hussie and 18 other inhabitantes" signed a petition 11th, 6th 1664 in the preacher's behalf. When Rev. Stephen Bachiler was preparing to leave Hampton he gave to Christopher Hussey and Theodate Bachiler Hussey "his cattle, goods and debts," according to "Pioneers of Massachusetts" by Charles Henry Pope. Colcott Colcord, a planter who lived at Salem, Massachusetts in 1637, gave a deposition 8th, 4th 1673 about the gift for legal records. Colcord lived in Dover, New Hampshire in 1673. Christopher Hussey was confirmed a lieutenant in the militia 14th, 6th, 1653. Theodate Bachiler Hussey died at Hampton October 20, 1649, according to Martha Burr Hollingsworth. Title to 250 acres of land initially granted to Christopher Hussey at Hampton was jeopardized when John Mason, an agent of Sir Ferdinando Gorges, original proprietor of New Hampshire and Maine, won a suit against him. As a result Christopher Hussey was imprisoned, and "he was forbidden to work and forced to live on the charity of his friends," according to "History of New Hampshire." Upon receiving his freedom he continued to live in the Hampton area and was named a deputy there in 1650. He, along with others, petitioned the General Court on behalf of Robert Pike 19th, 10th 1654, according to "Winthrop's Journal." On 1st, 11th 1654 Christopher Hussey and his nephew, John Sanborn of Hampton were required to give bond in the amount of 10 pounds in connection with the case. He continued as a lieutenant in the militia in 1658 and was promoted to captain in 1664. He was a representative to the General Court in 1658, 1659, 1660 and 1672. He was "Councillor in 1679 until Cranfield came in," according to "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire." When New Hampshire was made a royal province he was one of the commissioners named in the charter. He was empowered to perform marriages "within the limits of Hampton" 10th, 18th 1659 by the General Court. He was appointed to a committee tosurvey land granted to Thomas Lake 12th, 11, 1659. "Maxwell History and Genealogy" states [probably erroneously] that he was a shipowner and master with vessels in the East Indies trade. Shortly before this time Christopher Hussey became attracted to the Society of Friends. Quaker missionaries began to arrive in Massachusetts about 1656 and made rapid converts in New England. When the Congregationalists in New Hampshire were converted to the Society, the Puritans of Massachusetts redoubled their efforts in persecution of them. Quakers who remained in Massachusetts did so in fear of their lives. Four Friends were hanged on Boston Common in 1659 and 1660. Three Quaker women who came to New Hampshire in 1662 were arrested, tied behind a cart and paraded from town to town on their way out of the province. "Three vagabond Quaker women, Anna Coleman, Mary Tompkins and Abbie Ambrose, were made fast to the cart's tail and whipped down their naked backs through the town," according to "History of Rockingham County, New Hampshire" by D. Hamilton Hurd. It is believed that the revulsion that Christopher Hussey experienced at the sight of this incident was instrumental in his conversion to the Society of Friends. The entire congregation meeting at Hampton became Quakers early in the Quaker movement.